alphabetical author index

Alan Ayckbourn


Work by the author


This Is Where We Came In Talk in the Park, A Season's Greetings
My Wonderful Day My Very Own Story Mother Figure
If I Were You Gosforth's Fête Ernie's Incredible Illucinations
Drinking Companion Confusions By Jeeves
Absent Friends Absurd Person Singular Bedroom Farce
Between Mouthfuls Body Language Boy Who Fell Into A Book, The
Callisto 5 Champion of Paribanou, The Chorus of Disapproval, A
Comic Potential Communicating Doors Countdown
Cut In The Rates, A Drowning on Dry Land Family Circles
FlatSpin GamePlan Garden
House Gizmo Haunting Julia
Henceforward How the Other Half Loves Improbable Fiction
Intimate Exchanges: Volume I Invisible Friends It Could Be Any One of Us
Joking Apart Jollies, The Just Between Ourselves
Life and Beth Life of Riley Living Together
Man of the Moment Mr Whatnot Mr. A's Amazing Maze Plays
Neighbourhood Watch Norman Conquests, The Private Fears in Public Places
Relatively Speaking Revengers' Comedies, The RolePlay
Round and Round the Garden Sisterly Feelings Small Family Business, A
Snake in the Grass Suburban Strains Sugar Daddies
Surprises Table Manners Taking Steps
Things We Do for Love Way Upstream Wildest Dreams
Woman in Mind Arrivals and Departures Farcicals
Hero's Welcome Roundelay

Author's Bio


Alan Ayckbourn has spent his life in theatre, rarely if ever tempted by television or film, which perhaps explains why he continues to be so prolific. To date he has written 77 plays, and his work has been translated into over 35 languages, is performed on stage and television throughout the world, and has won countless awards.

Major successes include: Relatively Speaking, How the Other Half Loves, Absurd Person Singular, Bedroom Farce, A Chorus of Disapproval and The Norman Conquests. The National Theatre recently revived his 1980 play Season’s Greetings to great acclaim and the past year alone has seen West End productions of Absent Friends and A Chorus Of Disapproval.

In 2009, he retired as artistic director of the Stephen Joseph, where almost all his plays have been and continue to be first staged. Holding the post for 37 years, he still feels that perhaps his greatest achievement was the establishment of this company’s first permanent home when the two auditoria complex fashioned from a former Odeon Cinema opened in 1996.

In recent years, he has been inducted into American Theatre’s Hall of Fame, received the 2010 Critics’ Circle Award for Services to the Arts and became the first British playwright to receive both Olivier and Tony Special Lifetime Achievement Awards. He was knighted in 1997 for services to the theatre.